…why we say “Daylight Savings Time,”

We talk about time like it’s money, and that may explain why we say “Daylight Savings Time,” capitalizing the concept to emphasize its awesomeness. After all, who wouldn’t want to be able to save hours like cash? The phrase “Daylight Savings Time,” though commonly used in Australia, Canada, and the US, is technically incorrect. Time…
via “Daylight Savings” is grammatically incorrect — Quartz
8. Evidence does not conclusively point to energy conservation as a result of daylight saving. Dating back to Willett, daylight saving advocates have touted energy conservation as an economic benefit. A U.S. Department of Transportation study in the 1970s concluded that total electricity savings associated with daylight saving time amounted to about 1 percent in the spring and fall months. As air conditioning has become more widespread, however, more recent studies have found that cost savings on lighting are more than offset by greater cooling expenses. University of California Santa Barbara economists calculated that Indiana’s move to statewide daylight saving time in 2006 led to a 1-percent rise in residential electricity use through additional demand for air conditioning on summer evenings and heating in early spring and late fall mornings. Some also argue that increased recreational activity during daylight saving results in greater gasoline consumption. via History.com